TOURNAMENT CLASSES 

& Instructor Bios

This class will cover techniques on controlling the mental state during a fight. We will discuss and move through exercises on breathing through anxiety, as well as how to free up cognitive resources to sharpen focus and increase effectiveness and efficiency of movements.

Controlling the Mental State

by Nathaniel Bryant "Nate"

This class will explore thinking about developing a curriculum of fundamental martial arts movements versus a dizzying and unmanageable array of disparate interpretations. In this manner training can be more focused, students can progress through to the ‘competent in sparring’ stage much more quickly, and advanced students can expect a far higher success rate when applying more complex actions.

Required equipment: Sword

Movements Beat

Interpretations

by Sean Franklin

This workshop “Crash Course” will introduce Luis Diaz de Viedma's montante exercises.  Viedma has three montante exercises that are intended for the beginning student.  The workshop will emphasize differing interpretations for the rules, while still adhering to the source material.  Basic terminology will be covered, and no prior experience is necessary.

 

Required equipment: a montante or a long stick is ideal, but a feder will work okay as well.  Instructor will have a few to loan out.  No safety equipment (mask, gloves, etc) is required.

"Crash Course" Montante by Viedma

This workshop “Crash Course” will introduce Luis Diaz de Viedma's montante exercises.  Viedma has three montante exercises that are intended for the beginning student.  The workshop will emphasize differing interpretations for the rules, while still adhering to the source material.  Basic terminology will be covered, and no prior experience is necessary.

 

Required equipment: a montante or a long stick is ideal, but a feder will work okay as well.  Instructor will have a few to loan out.  No safety equipment (mask, gloves, etc) is required.

"Crash Course" Montante by Viedma

by Mat Korteum

An introduction to Domenico Angelo's 1763 'L'Ecole des armes' (The School of Fencing). This class will be a beginner level class suitable for novice smallsword fencers, though all levels are welcome. Expect an introduction to stance and footwork; solo and partner drills with a focus on the Carte thrust, parry and return; and an introduction to the Tierce thrust, parry and return if time allows. 

 

Required equipment: BYO small sword as well as helmet, gorget, gambeson, and light gloves.

Fundamentals of Smallsword

by Sarah Potratz

This class will cover how to attack low targets safely and intelligently. Learn how to read the fight to identify the appropriate time to apply low target attacks. Learn effective footwork, applying the concepts of the haupstucke such as uberlauffen, and then applying across multiple weapons. 

Required equipment:

The Tactics of Attacking Low Targets

by Brittany Reeves

This class will explore some of the foundational principles in Japanese swordsmanship in a historical and martial context. After a brief discussion, the class will participate in a workshop style exploration. We will examine the kenjutsu principles using specific techniques and then work to note similarities and differences between the kenjutsu and a more HEMA-centric approach.

Required equipment: a wooden or polypropylene bokken is preferred. However, any two-handed trainer (wooden or synthetic) will suffice. Instructor will have some basic wooden bokken for sale ($15). Mask and gloves preferred for extra safety.

Principles of Kenjutsu

by Geoffrey Beeson

Introduction to Sword and Dagger

by Jon Eppler

Introduction to sword and dagger: a practical introduction to use of the dagger as a secondary for use alongside the sidesword or rapier.

The Bolognese masters shared a very conservative approach to the fight. In this class we will examine the tempos and methods that the masters used to enter measure and attack in safety. This class will be weapon agnostic, the concepts and techniques across a multitude of weapons

Required Gear: Fencing Mask, Weapon of Choice

The Bolognese Approach to the Fight

by Will Phillips

This class will go over the Vertical strikes from Meyer's Art of Combat and applications to it. While originally found in the Rappier section, we find this concept/technique in the sections after it. With this in mind we will apply it to the longsword and how his targeting system shows you how to apply it. Also, where we can potentially find it in the earlier KdF sources and how this can add a new view on fencing and the angles of which we strike.

 

Required equipment: feder/blunt mask and gloves.

Optional: jacket

Dempffen: How the Cut Supresses

by Josh Furrate

Everything starts when you "approach with resolution".  This intentional action is described by Fabris in "the Art of Dueling" as a very direct and specific way of entering into a fight. In this class, we will examine this concept and explore how it can be used to interpret the sieges that are outlined in MS I.33.  We will be utilizing some of Fabris' terminology to help break down and make the subject matter more accessible. Though these fighting systems are centuries apart, they can still inform one another and inspire a cohesive fighting style tat draws from many sources and weapons.  Class will progress through various forms and drills then end with applying the concepts from both of these manuscripts to KdF longsword.   

Salvatore Fabris: How I Learned to Love the Siege

by Anthony Buonomo

This class will cover discussions of the wheel and term, known common combatant guards, attacks, and moves, as well as intentions and mindsets. Exercises will consist of application of move sets to the corresponding wheel actions. We will also discuss footwork and perform exercises to modify the previous wheel to reflect footwork and discuss movement and how it can reverse or fast-forward the wheel. 

Tactical Application of the Modern Tactical Wheel

by Court Dyke

This class will cover the core techniques that facilitate the advancement to becoming a gold medal cutter. I will help you tune your bio-mechanics, grip and footwork that will have you slicing and dicing tatami. You will also learn drills you can do at home with a trainer, or even bare handed without a sword! At the end of class you will get to test yourself with an actual sharp sword.

 

Required Equipment: synthetic or steel sword (not sharp).

 

Water Bottle Cutting: $5 (includes 1 case water bottles and use of a sharp)*

Tatami Cutting: $10 (includes 1 mat and use of a sharp)*

*Note: prices are estimated for water bottles and tatami and are subject to change.

Cutting for Beginners

by Justinder Singh

From singing to weightlifting, there are fundamental mechanics to be found in many everyday activities and hobbies that can improve our fencing. We'll explore effective breathing and core engagement with vocal technique (no one required to sing), optimal loaded movement in weightlifting, and postural stability at a distance with drawing. All of these will be applied in structured drills as we move through the class and can be applied to any weapon. By the end of the class, students should leave with the understanding that efficient use of the body can be observed, identified, and applied to or from many otherwise unrelated activities, broadening their ideas of where mastery can be found.

 

Required Equipment: Sword

Broader Horizons

for Better Fencing

by Bryant Coston

If Jiu Jitsu is translated to the “Gentle Art,” then Catch Wrestling would be the violent art. Catch Wrestling (short for Catch-As-Catch-Can Wrestling) is a mixed grappling style that originated in England in the late 1800’s with roots to medieval wrestling. Today, you can see Catch Wrestling alive in MMA with fighters such as former UFC Heavyweight Champion, Josh Barnett. Catch Wrestling focuses on takedowns, pins, submission locks, chokes, and neck cranks. This workshop will be an introduction to the basics of catch wrestling with an emphasis on how to get your opponent off balanced, maintain dominance, and obtain a submission. No prior experience is needed and all are welcome. 

Catch Wrestling: The Violent Art

by Jacob McDonald

In this class, we will take a breadth-first approach through Meyer’s Dusack material, starting with Meyer’s Drills.  We shall focus particularly on the footwork and the 4 cuts described in these first Drills. Next , we will briefly cover Meyer’s Dusack guards and *perhaps* his named Hews (time permitting).  Finally, we will go back to Meyer’s 4th Drill to explore one of the most fundamental concepts underpinning Meyer’s Dusack material (i.e. Provoker, Taker, Hitter) and to practice combining our footwork, bodywork & handwork.

Required Equipment:  A Dusack trainer of some sort, preferably non-metallic.  Mask & gloves (whatever you feel comfortable with doing high-intensity drills).

Meyer's  Dusack:

A Complete Introduction

by Dustin Reagan

Most everyone in modern HEMA will tell you about the importance of good footwork, but how many of us train it sufficiently? Or are even able to define it? This class will cover the fundamental physical actions required for the performance of good footwork, while demonstrating how to piece these movements together to achieve the specific tactical goals of range management. You will leave this class with a theoretical framework for how to effectively apply range management in sparring and competition, and a variety of drills to help develop the skillsets necessary to apply what you have learned.

Required gear: Steel longsword feder/blunt, mask, gorget, light gloves optional, athletic cup optional 

by Andrew Weems

Footwork and Range Management for Longsword Fencing

740 NE 27th Street 

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Moore, Oklahoma 73160

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